.

                                             SUFFOLK COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE

                                                              SELDEN, NEW YORK

 

                                                                COURSE OUTLINE

                                                                                                                                                           

Catalog Number:  EG 71 (ENG 215)                                                   Course Title:  American Literature I

 

Instructor: Dr Donald Gilzinger Jr                                                                                Semester: Fall 2006

 

My Office: Islip 2-M                                                                           Office Hours: M, T, Th, F 8:00-9:30

Phone:  451.4095 [inc. voice mail]                                                                   Other hours by appointment

          Or Dept Office: 451.4159                                                                                                             

Email: gilzind@sunysuffolk.edu                                                          Web: www2.sunysuffolk.edu/gilzind

 

 

TO COMPLETE EG 71 SUCCESSFULLY YOU MUST BE ABLE TO DO THE FOLLOWING:

 

1. Demonstrate familiarity with the works of American writers from the era preceding discovery and first contact
 through the Civil War.

2. Evaluate the literature of the period within the context of the historical, political, religious, cultural, and
philosophical settings that produced it.

3. Identify Early American literary movements and understand how they reflected and influenced their age.

4. Interact with writers who have mirrored the deepest dreams and anxieties, hopes and fears, of the Early
American nation

5. Explain the role of our early literature in defining and representing American culture.

6. Identify the ways in which the richness and diversity of Early American culture and literature have influenced,
and continue to influence, American society.

7. Demonstrate an ability to write critical analyses that reflect an understanding of the literature, are logically
organized, and are written in clear, concise prose.

8. Write essays of literary analysis that demonstrate the following qualities: controlling purpose, clear focus,
adequate development, logical organization, and use of textual details to support purpose.

 

Procedures for accomplishing objectives:

1.  Lectures to provide introductory material and to establish a framework for class discussion of the readings.

2.  Group discussions to discover, identify, and analyze the attributes of the texts and the style, materials, and
assumptions of the authors.

3.  Writing assignments designed to evoke a critical response to the texts, the authors, the ideologies, the
relationship between language and geography, et cetera.

 

Your requirements for the completion of the course:

1.  Read carefully all assigned material, including background material as required.

2.  Complete all reading assignments on time.

3.  Write analytical essays, or other directed writing assignments, and submit them when due. All essays must
be typed double-spaced. ESSAYS WILL BE GRADED DOWN FOR EACH DAY THEY ARE LATE.

4.  Participate actively in class or group discussions, projects, or presentations.

5.  Take all tests and quizzes.

6.  IN ORDER TO PASS THIS CLASS, YOU MUST TAKE ALL TESTS AND QUIZZES AND HAND IN ALL
WRITING ASSIGNMENTS.           

 

Procedure for grading:

Your final grade will be determined by my evaluation of your entire semester's work, with special

emphasis on completion of course objectives. However, grading will generally adhere to the following

percentages:  Essays 30%; Mid-Term Exam  25%; Final Exam  25%; Quizzes & One-Pagers 20% = 100%

 

 

Attendance and courtesy:

Attendance is mandatory. You may be absent three (3) times. I will drop you from the course after
four (4) absences (regardless of excuses) and give you a grade of W or F according to my discretion. There are
no exceptions, so please plan accordingly.

            If you are late, you must assume personal responsibility to ensure that I alter the attendance record at
the end of class. I will not change the record at a later date. A pattern of lateness will result in a lower final grade.

You may not leave class before the end of the session.

Turn off all electronics before class begins.

ABSENCE IS NOT AN EXCUSE FOR FAILING TO COMPLETE ASSIGNED WORK; therefore, it is your
responsibility to acquire class notes and assignments when you miss a class.

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Text:  Lauter, Paul, et al. The Heath Anthology of American Literature. 5/e  Volumes A & B

 

1. Introduction:  The American Dream (Readings in Volume A)

 

2. Iroquois or Confederacy of the Five Nations (54-57)

    Columbus      from Journal of the First Voyage to America, 1492-1493 (120-28)

    Cabeza de Vaca        from the Relation (141-52)

    Champlain     from the Voyages (220-24)

    Smith            from A Description of New England (264-66)

 

3. Winthrop       from A Modell of Christian Charity (309-17)

    Bradford        from Of Plymouth Plantation (326-40)

 

4. de Crevecoeur from Letters from an American Farmer (925-33)

    Franklin         from The Autobiography (828-90)

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(Readings in Volume B)

5. Irving            “Rip Van Winkle” (2153-65)

   Cooper           from The Pioneers (2187-2207)

   Poe               “Ligeia” (2462-72)

                        “The Fall of the House of Usher” (2472-85)

                        “The Black Cat” (2495-2501)

ESSAY #1 due

 

6. Mid-Term Examination

 

7. Emerson       “The American Scholar” (1609-21)

                        “Self-Reliance” (1621-38)

   Thoreau          from Walden (1753-87)

 

8. Hawthorne     “My Kinsman, Major Molineux” (2245-58)

                        “Young Goodman Brown” (2258-67)

                        The Scarlet Letter (2331-2444)

   Melville           “Benito Cerano” (2669-2726)

 

9. Whitman       “Song of Myself” (2937-82)

                        “Crossing Brooklyn Ferry” (2995-99)

 

10. Dickinson    “Wild Nights” (3049-50), “I’m Nobody!” (3051), “The Soul selects” (3053), “Some keep the Sabbath”
(3056), “A Bird came down the Walk” (3056), “I heard a Fly buzz” (3061-62), “Because I could not stop”
(3071-72), “Tell all the Truth” (3076), and others as assigned

ESSAY #2 due

 

11. Final Examination