Objectives:

Learning Activities for this course  will include: Readings, Discussions and written assignments to assit the student to achieve these learning Objectives:   To enable a student to:  

PHIL101  INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY

A. DISCIPLINE-SPECIFIC LEARNING OBJECTIVES

1. Identify some of the basic content in the field of Philosophy (vocabulary, concepts, theories)
2. Identify traditional and current Issues in Philosophy;  
3.Communicate awareness of and understanding of philosophical issues.
4. Demonstrate familiarity with the main areas of philosophic discourse and be able to state what major schools of thought there are that have contributed to the ongoing discussion of these issues  
5. Develop skills of critical analysis and dialectical thinking.  
6. Analyze and respond to the comments of other students regarding philosophical issues.
  

COURSE OBJECTIVES AND OUTCOMES

B. QCC General Educational Objectives

·         communicate effectively through reading, writing, listening and speaking

·         use analytical reasoning to identify issues or problems and evaluate evidence in order to make informed decisions

·         use information management and technology skills effectively for academic research and lifelong learning

·         differentiate and make informed decisions about issues based on multiple value systems

C.  CUNY PATHWAYS LEARNING OUTCOMESAs of Fall 2013 according to CUNY Chancellor Matthew Goldstein and Vice Chancellor Alexandra Logue  the learning outcomes must be as indicated below                    II.D. INDIVIDUAL AND SOCIETY

Gather, interpret, and assess information from a variety of sources and points of view.

Evaluate evidence and arguments critically or analytically.

Produce well-reasoned written or oral arguments using evidence to support conclusions.] 

Identify and apply the fundamental concepts and methods of a discipline or interdisciplinary field exploring the relationship between the individual and society, including, but not limited to, anthropology, communications, cultural studies, history, journalism, philosophy, political science, psychology, public affairs, religion, and sociology.

Articulate and assess ethical views and their underlying premises.

Identify and engage with local, national, or global trends or ideologies, and analyze their impact on individual or collective decision-making.

 

7. General Education objectives addressed by this course:

 

General educational objectives addressed by this course

Briefly describe activities in the course which help students meet each of these general education objectives

   

 Communicate effectively through reading, writing, listening and speaking  

a.       Students demonstrate understanding  of    applications of philosophical methods  to key issues.

b.     Students read relevant philosophical          texts; by departmental policy all  sections are designated “Writing  Intensive”

c.    Students will indicate how philosophical  methods are applied to various  problems and issues.

Use analytical reasoning to identify issues or problems and evaluate evidence in order to make informed decisions  

 

a.      Students discuss theories, concepts, and debates in  philosophy

b.      Students analyze and critique  philosophical arguments and positions

c.       Students identify relevance of  philosophy to everyday life and career interests

d.       Students will analyze examples from other disciplines to illustrate how concepts from philosophy apply. 

 Differentiate and make informed decisions about issues based on multiple value systems

a.       Students discuss applications of  philosophical theory to other fields of  inquiry.

b.    Students identify relevance of philosophy to everyday life and career  interests

c.    Students will analyze examples from other disciplines to illustrate how concepts from philosophy apply.

d.    Students will select topics in philosophy to use as themes in other courses.

 

 

8. CUNY PATHWAYS Objectives

As of Fall 2013 according to CUNY Chancellor Matthew Goldstein and Vice Chancellor Alexandra Logue  the learning outcomes must be as indicated below

II.D  Individual and Society

Expected Student Outcomes and Objectives

·      Gather, interpret, and assess information from a variety of sources and points of view.

Students will understand philosophical texts effectively through readings in the textbook and ancillary documents and articles on a diversity of philosophical perspectives

·      Evaluate evidence and arguments critically or analytically.

Students will critically evaluate philosophical theories

·      Produce well-reasoned written or oral arguments using evidence to support conclusions.

Students will construct written essays, responses, and/or papers demonstrating the use of evidence-based information in drawing conclusions about issues in philosophy.

- Identify and apply the fundamental concepts and methods of a discipline

or interdisciplinary field exploring the relationship between the individual

and society, including, but not limited to, anthropology, communications,

cultural studies, history, journalism, philosophy, political science, psychology, public affairs, religion, and sociology

Students will identify the fundamental concepts and methods of philosophy and how these can e used to better understand the relationship between the individual and society.

· Articulate and assess ethical views and their underlying premises.

 

Students will demonstrate an understanding of the appropriate use of philosophical methods in analyzing different ethical perspectives.

· Identify and engage with local, national, or global trends or ideologies,

and analyze their impact on individual or collective decision-making.

 

Students will draw conclusions about societal institutions and individual beliefs based on the methods of philosophical analysis.

 

 

 

 

 

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